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7/1/2005



Rail News: Rail Industry Trends

AAR traffic update: U.S. roads remain in traffic groove; Canadian roads and TFM still in carload slump


U.S. railroads continued to increase traffic in late June. During the week ending June 25, the roads boosted carloads 0.6 percent to 335,731 units and increased intermodal loads 4.4 percent to 227,134 units compared with the same 2004 week, according to Association of American Railroads data.

About halfway through 2005, the roads remained ahead of last year’s pace. Through the year’s first 25 weeks, U.S. roads moved 8,351,724 carloads, up 1.7 percent, and 5,432,780 trailers and containers, up 6.2 percent compared with the same 2004 period. Total estimated volume of 793.4 billion ton-miles rose 2.5 percent.

Meanwhile, Canadian railroads still were mired in a carload drought. During the week ending June 25, the roads’ carloads dropped 2.8 percent to 75,002 units compared with the same 2004 week. Through 25 weeks, the roads moved 1,915,252 carloads or 0.1 percent fewer units than last year.

However, Canadian roads’ weekly intermodal loads rose 0.8 percent to 41,669 units and 25-week loads increased 2.4 percent to 1,055,447 units compared with similar 2004 periods.

On a combined cumulative-volume basis through 25 weeks, U.S. and Canadian roads moved 10,266,976 carloads, up 1.4 percent, and 6,488,227 trailers and containers, up 5.5 percent compared with last year.

In Mexico, TFM S.A. de C.V. also remained in a carload slump. During the week ending June 25, the road’s carloads totaling 8,018 units dropped 13.3 percent compared with the same 2004 week. TFM did boost weekly intermodal loads 2.9 percent to 4,091 units. Through 25 weeks, TFM moved 215,687 cars, up 0.7 percent, and 96,940 trailers and containers, up 7.8 percent compared with last year.


Contact Progressive Railroading editorial staff.

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