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Rail News Home Intermodal

8/3/2007



Rail News: Intermodal

Savannah port sets annual container traffic record; Vancouver port sets new monthly and first-half volume marks


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The Port of Savannah, Ga., handled 2.4 million 20-foot equivalent units (TEUs) in fiscal-year 2007 — a 145 percent increase compared with FY2006 and a new volume record.

The container traffic in FY2007, which ended June 30, made the facility the East Coast’s second-busiest terminal and nation’s fourth-busiest port, according to the Georgia Ports Authority (GPA).

During the past 10 years, TEU volume has skyrocketed 235 percent from 697,259 to 2.4 million and intermodal lifts have jumped 136 percent from 99,858 to 235,448.

“Georgia continues to attract container volume faster than any other state in the nation,” said GPA Executive Director Doug Marchand in a prepared statement. “This is the result of … significant market share increases in trades like India, South and Northeast Asia, Europe and the Mediterranean.”

Meanwhile, the Port of Vancouver, British Columbia, set a monthly volume record in June at 7.8 million tons, breaking the previous high established in October 2006 by nearly 300,000 tons, according to the Vancouver Port Authority.

Through 2007’s first half, total tonnage increased 4.5 percent to a record 39.9 million tons compared with the same 2006 period. Container volume totaled 1.1 million units, up 5 percent year over year primarily because of stronger-than-expected export traffic.

The port also reported first-half volume gains in coal, sulphur, minerals/metals/inorganic chemicals, petroleum products, and lumber and wood products. However, grain traffic decreased compared with first-half 2006.


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