Progressive Railroading



RAIL EMPLOYMENT

Newsletter Sign Up
Stay updated on news, articles and information for the rail industry


All fields are required.





Rail News Home Rail Industry Trends

10/2/2006



Rail News: Rail Industry Trends

U.S. railroads continue to boost intermodal volume, AAR says



U.S. railroads didn’t set another record, but their latest weekly intermodal traffic still was bulletin board material. During the week ending Sept. 23, the roads originated 256,193 trailer and containers, up 6.3 percent compared with similar 2005 data, according to the Association of American Railroads. Weekly carload traffic rose, too, increasing 1 percent to 338,141 units.

During 2006’s first 38 weeks, U.S. railroads originated 12.8 million carloads, up 1.3 percent, and 8.9 million trailers and containers, up 6.3 percent compared with similar 2005 data. Total estimated volume of 1.27 trillion ton-miles rose 2.6 percent.

Canadian railroads also boosted weekly intermodal traffic. During the week ending Sept. 23, the roads originated 48,663 trailers and containers, a 5.8 percent increase compared with the same 2005 week. However, originated carloads totaling 76,329 units dropped 2.6 percent.

Through 38 weeks, Canadian railroads originated 2.8 million carloads, down 1.1 percent, and 1.7 million trailers and containers, up 5.8 percent compared with similar 2005 data.

On a combined cumulative-volume basis through 38 weeks, 13 reporting U.S. and Canadian railroads originated 15.6 million carloads, up 0.9 percent, and 10.7 million trailers and containers, up 6.3 percent compared with 2005’s first 38 weeks.

In Mexico, Kansas City Southern de México S.A. de C.V. reported total weekly carload volume of 11,024 units, down 9.2 percent, and total intermodal volume of 4,770 units, up 14.9 percent compared with similar 2005 data. Through 38 weeks, the railroad’s total carloads decreased 4.3 percent to 429,737 units and total intermodal volume declined 3.7 percent to 150,845 units compared with 2005’s first 38 weeks.


Contact Progressive Railroading editorial staff.

More News from 10/2/2006