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Rail News Home Passenger Rail

October 2010



Rail News: Passenger Rail

Passenger Rail at a Glance: Agency Profiles



Amtrak

A national intercity passenger railroad launched in 1971.

Route miles: 21,000 intercity rail

Rolling stock: 328 locomotives, average age 20 years; 1,413 rail cars, average age 25 years; 130 single-level long-distance cars similar to the Viewliner model on order from CAF USA, including 25 sleeping cars, 25 dining cars, 55 baggage cars and 25 baggage/dormitory cars. The first cars of the $298.1 million order are expected to be delivered in October 2012.

Annual ridership: 27.2 million (FY2009)

Annual operating cost: $3.4 billion (FY2009)

Annual capital cost: $761.2 million (FY2009)

Number of stations: 529

Major capital improvement projects include:

  • Rehabilitating the Pelham Bay Bridge, Bronx, N.Y.
  • Rehabilitating, restoring and returning to service 81 passenger cars and 15 locomotives in Beech Grove, Ind., and Bear, Del.
  • Upgrading maintenance facilities in Seattle, Los Angeles and Hialeah, Fla.
  • Conducting major station renovations in Wilmington, Del., and Sanford, Fla.
  • Completing Americans with Disabilities Act improvements at more than 200 stations.

Amtrak also will launch Northeast Corridor projects, including constructing a new electrical sub-station at Ivy City in Washington, D.C.; replacing and modernizing electrical transformers along the Washington, D.C.-to-New York City line; replacing more than 100,000 concrete ties; upgrading a catenary wire system along the Hell Gate Line in New York; constructing new air ventilation shafts for New York City tunnels; and replacing the movable Niantic River Bridge in East Lyme, Conn.

Amtrak also is implementing the first step in a long-term fleet renewal plan, in addition to reorganizing and establishing a department that will develop new intercity, high-speed rail service in select corridors around the country. Amtrak also is planning major improvements on the Northeast Corridor (including studying the feasibility of increasing top speeds to 220 mph).

 

ALASKA

Alaska Railroad Corp. (ARRC)

A state-owned corporation providing passenger and freight rail transportation services, as well as overseeing leasing of railroad land for commercial/business and public uses.

Route miles: 467 heavy rail, mainline miles

Rolling stock: 51 locomotives, average age 13.6 years; 47 passenger cars

Annual ridership: 470,786 (2009)

Annual operating cost: Not provided

Annual capital cost: Not provided

Number of stations: 10

Projects in Anchorage:

  • Ship Creek Intermodal Transportation Center-Phase One, which was completed in 2009 and involved adding two passenger tracks and upgrading the two existing tracks parallel to the Anchorage Historic Depot. Phase Two is under way, and involves upgrading the historic depot.
  • Anchorage capacity improvements between mileposts 101 and 114. The agency currently is conducting an environmental analysis to add a second track along a four-mile stretch of the mainline between the Anchorage Rail Yard and the spur leading to the Anchorage Airport Rail Station.

Projects in Mat-Su:

  • Port MacKenzie Rail Extension, a 30- to 45-mile extension (depending on selected route) between Port MacKenzie and the existing main track near Meadow Lakes and Willow. The project's environmental impact statement is expected to be completed later this year. Some funding for right-of-way acquisition was obtained earlier in the year. Final design and construction funding has not yet been identified.
  • South Wasilla Rail Line Relocation, a project to straighten a four-mile stretch of curvy track just south of Wasilla. Environmental analysis is complete and right-of-way acquisition for the first two miles will be complete later this year. Funding to begin construction has not been identified.

Projects in Fairbanks and the Interior (the area of the state that is largely wilderness):

  • Fairbanks Depot Second Track, completed earlier this year.
  • Nenana Rail Line Relocation: a project to realign the main track around downtown Nenana. ARRC completed the environmental analysis several years ago. Land acquisition is nearly finalized and final design is underway. No funding has been identified for the construction phase.
  • Northern Rail Extension: a project to extend rail from the current northern terminus near the North Pole 80 miles southeast to Delta Junction. Construction on Phase One — building a bridge over the Tanana River at Salcha — is expected to begin later this year.

Contact: Stephenie Wheeler, corporate communications officer; 907-265-2671; wheelers@akrr.com

 

ARIZONA

Valley Metro

Valley Metro operates the Phoenix-area transit system, including the METRO light-rail line. The first 20-mile section of the light-rail line opened in December 2008. The agency is planning 37 miles of extensions.

Route miles: 20 light rail

Rolling stock: 50 light-rail trains

Annual ridership: 12.1 million (FY2010)

Annual operating cost: $33.7 million (FY2010)

Annual capital cost: Not provided

Number of stations: 28

The city of Phoenix was awarded funds through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expand the METRO light-rail park-and-ride facility at Central Avenue/Camelback, and also add shade canopies at that park-and-ride — and another park-and-ride facility — along Camelback Road. Project details include expanding the park-and-ride to the west by adding 143 spaces and installing shade canopies to more than 90 parking spaces at the Central Avenue/Camelback Road park-and-ride and 287 spaces at the 19th Avenue Camelback park-and-ride.

Construction on the $3.9 million project began in May and is scheduled to be completed in late fall.

Contact: Hillary Foose, public information officer; 602-322-4468

 

CALIFORNIA

Altamont Commuter Express (ACE)

ACE launched passenger-rail service in 1998 between San Joaquin, Alameda and Santa Clara counties.

Route miles: 86.5 commuter rail

Rolling stock: Six locomotives; 32 rail cars

Annual ridership: Not provided

Annual operating cost: $15.4 million

Annual capital cost: $66.7 million

Number of stations: 9

Projects include:
  • A new equipment maintenance facility in Stockton. Construction is expected to begin in the middle of FY2011, subject to funding availability and weather conditions. The project is expected to cost $25.7 million.
  • The mid-life overhaul of three locomotives — a carry-over project from the FY2009-2010 capital budget. One locomotive was overhauled last year. This year, ACE will overhaul the remaining two oldest locomotives in the fleet. Work will include rebuilding the prime mover, replacing head-end power generator sets, upgrading the microprocessor systems, rebuilding the electrical systems, rebuilding air compressors, performing body work and repainting locomotives. The project is estimated to cost $3 million.
  • Overhauling HVAC units on passenger cars and purchasing wheel blanks and a traction motor. The project is expected to cost $500,000.

Contact: Brenda Porter, contracts administrator 209-944-6222; brenda@acerail.com

Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART)

BART operates heavy-rail service the San Francisco Bay Area. Service was launched in 1972.

Route miles: 104 heavy rail

Rolling stock: 669 rail cars — 439 cars are 38 years old, 150 cars are 22 years old and 80 cars are 16 years old; BART is currently circulating a request for proposals for 1,000 new cars to replace the entire fleet. Notice to proceed will be given to a supplier by the end of 2010.

Annual ridership: 107 million

Annual operating cost: $643 million

Annual capital cost: $585 million

Number of stations: 43

BART has begun or is planning to begin work on the following projects:

  • Central Contra Costa County Crossover, a $38.5 million project to add two crossover tracks between the Pleasant Hill and Walnut Creek stations. Engineering began in 2005 and construction is expected to be finished in December. BART received $13 million in American Reinvestment and Recovery Act grants for the project.
  • Earthquake Safety, a $1.31 million project (2004 dollars) to upgrade vulnerable areas system-wide. Work includes reinforcing 74 miles of track; 34 stations; the Transbay Tube; the Berkeley Hills Tunnel; several train maintenance yards; terminal, operations and administration facilities; power; mechanical; train control; and communications equipment. Work is ongoing and projected to be complete in 2014.
  • Warm Springs Extension, an $890 million project to extend service 5.4 miles from the existing Fremont Station to a new station in the Warm Springs district of Fremont. The project is expected to be complete by 2014.
  • West Dublin/Pleasanton Station development, an $80 million project to build 1,200 parking spaces and 210 housing units, office space and a hotel. Funding includes $15 million from private partnerships. The project is scheduled to be completed in 2011.
  • East Contra Costa Extension and Livermore extension, both of which are in the planning phase.
  • Oakland Airport Connector, a $484 million automated guideway transit system between Coliseum Station and Oakland Airport. Construction is projected to be complete in 2014.

Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (L.A. Metro)

L.A. Metro serves as transportation planner and coordinator, designer, builder and operator for Los Angeles County. Light-rail service was launched in 1990; heavy-rail service, in 1993.

Route miles: 61.7 light rail; 17.4 heavy rail

Rolling stock: 250 light-rail trains with three cars per consist, average age 15 years

Annual ridership: 46.4 million, light rail; 47.9 million, heavy rail

Annual operating cost: $104.4 million, light rail; $54.9 million, heavy rail

Annual capital cost: $18 million, light rail; $5 million, heavy rail

Number of stations: 57 light rail; 16 heavy rail

L.A. Metro plans to spend $80 million on a Metro Blue Line traction power sub-station replacement project. The agency has contracted Siemens to complete the work. L.A. Metro also plans to begin the process of procuring additional light-rail trains and overhauling heavy-rail vehicles within the next year — and overhauling light-rail vehicles within the next 15 months.

North County Transit District (NCTD)

NCTD is a multi-modal transit provider offering commuter-rail, light-rail and bus services to the San Diego area. Commuter-rail service was launched in 1995 and light-rail service, in 2007.

Route miles: 42 commuter rail; 21 light rail

Rolling stock: 7 locomotives, average age 9 years; 28 rail cars, average age 8 years; 12 light-rail trains with 1 or 2 cars per consist, average age 4 years

Annual ridership: 1.3 million, commuter rail; 2.1 million, light rail

Annual operating cost: $15 million, commuter rail; $13 million, light rail

Annual capital cost: Not provided

Number of stations: 8 commuter rail; 15 light rail

All of NCTD's right-of-way projects are handled by the San Diego Association of Governments, the local inter-governmental agency.

Contact: Lane Fernandes, manager of rail; 760-967-2850; lfernandes@nctd.org

Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA)

VTA is an independent special district responsible for light rail, bus and paratransit operations; congestion management; specific highway improvement projects; and county-wide transportation planning. The agency launched light-rail service in 1987.

Route miles: 42.2 light rail

Rolling stock: 100 light-rail trains with up to 3 cars per consist; average age 5 years

Annual ridership: 10.8 million

Annual operating cost: $42.9 million

Annual capital cost: $335 million

Number of stations: 62

VTA is building a 2.6-mile light-rail extension into east San Jose in Santa Clara County. The project is awaiting final design and construction until the federal environmental review phase is completed because additional funding is necessary.

Contact: Brandi Childress 408-464-7810; brandi.childress@vta.org

 

COLORADO

Regional Transportation District of Denver (RTD)

RTD operates light-rail service in the Denver metropolitan region. Service was launched in 1994.

Route miles: Not provided

Rolling stock: 151 light-rail trains with 3 cars per consist, average age 8-9 years old; 21 cars on order from Siemens

Annual ridership: 19.5 million

Annual operating cost: $29 million

Annual capital cost: Not provided

Number of stations: 36

Denver RTD is in the midst of its FasTracks program, which calls for building 122 miles of new light- and commuter-rail lines, 18 miles of bus rapid transit service and 21,000 new parking spaces at rail and bus stations — as well as redeveloping Denver Union Station into a multi-modal transportation hub. The program consists of six new transit corridors and extensions to three existing corridors.

The rail lines include:

  • West Corridor, a 12.1-mile light-rail line to connect downtown Denver, Jefferson County, Lakewood and Golden. The project includes building 11 new stations and relocating the Auraria West station. Construction is under way and scheduled to be completed in 2013.
  • East Corridor, a 22.8-mile commuter-rail line (featuring electric multiple units) to connect downtown Denver and Denver International Airport. The corridor includes five proposed stations. Construction is slated to begin later this year and be completed by 2016.
  • Northwest Rail Corridor (formerly Longmont Diagonal Rail Project), a 41-mile commuter-rail line (featuring diesel multiple units) connecting downtown Denver, Westminster, Broomfield, Superior, Louisville, Boulder and Longmont. The project includes seven proposed stations and four unfunded stations. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2011 on the first segment from Denver Union Station to South Westminster. Construction is expected to be completed in 2019.
  • Gold Line, an 11.2-mile commuter-rail corridor (featuring electric multiple units) that would connect downtown Denver, Arvada and Wheat Ridge, including seven proposed stations. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2011 and be completed in 2016.
  • North Metro Corridor, an 18-mile commuter-rail line (featuring electric multiple units) to connect downtown Denver, Commerce City, Northglenn and Thornton with eight proposed stations. Construction is expected to begin in 2011 and be completed by 2015.
  • I-225 Corridor, a 10.5-mile commuter-rail line that would connect the Southeast Corridor to the East Corridor through Aurora, with eight proposed stations. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2011 and be completed in 2019.
  • Central Corridor Extension, a 0.8-mile commuter-rail line (featuring electric multiple units) to connect the Central and East corridors, with two proposed stations. Construction is scheduled to be completed in 2016.
  • Southeast Corridor Extension, a 2.3-mile light-rail extension connecting Lincoln Avenue to RidgeGate Parkway in Lone Tree, with three proposed stations. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2013 and be completed in 2019.
  • Southwest Corridor Extension, a 2.5-mile light-rail extension to connect the Mineral Station in Littleton to Highlands Ranch, with two stations. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2013 and be completed in 2019.

 

FLORIDA

South Florida Regional Transportation Authority (SFRTA)

SFRTA operates the Tri-Rail commuter-rail system. Service was launched in 1989.

Route miles: 144 commuter rail

Rolling stock: 16 locomotives, average age 15 years; 26 rail cars, average age 20 years; two bi-level Colorado Railcar diesel multiple units, including 4 power DMU cars and 2 DMU coaches; and 14 bi-level cab cars and coaches on order with Rotem/Hyundai, to be delivered in 2010. SFRTA received $15 million in stimulus funding, which will be used to purchase locomotives.

Annual ridership: 3.8 million (2009)

Annual operating cost: $64 million

Annual capital cost: $101.9 million

Number of stations: 18

SFRTA has no capital projects at this time.

Contact: Cris Bross, director of contracts and procurement; 954-788-7911; brossc@sfrta.fl.gov

 

ILLINOIS

Chicago Transit Authority (CTA)

CTA operates the nation's second-largest public transit system, providing rail and bus service to the city of Chicago and 40 surrounding suburbs. Service was launched in 1892.

Route miles: 224.1 heavy rail

Rolling stock: Four locomotives, average age 25 years; 1,190 rail cars, average age 27 years; 406 rail cars currently on order (CTA is testing the prototypes)

Annual ridership: 202.6 million (2009)

Annual operating cost: $1.3 billion

Annual capital cost: $668.5 million (2009)

Number of stations: 144

CTA continues to update its rail fleet and will replace older rail cars — some of which are more than 30 years old, such as the 2200-series Budd cars that were purchased in 1969-70, as well as the 2400-series Boeing-Vertol cars purchased in 1976-78 — with new rail cars. The new cars will feature enhancements such as security cameras, aisle-facing seating and alternating current traction motor propulsion. CTA has awarded a contract to Bombardier Transportation for a base order of 406 rail cars with additional options that could bring the total purchase to 706 cars. The contract cost is $603.6 million, without escalation. CTA is testing the rail-car prototypes to evaluate all aspects of car design and operation.

CTA will continue its plan to reduce and prevent slow zones by replacing deteriorated wood ties, worn running rail and contact rail in order to restore normal train speeds and reduce travel times. Slow zone work on the Red Line North Main between Addison and Howard will be completed later this year and work in the Blue Line Dearborn Subway was completed early this year.

The oldest portions of CTA's signal system are being replaced as part of two separate projects covering the Loop and the Blue Line. The total project budgets are $103 million and $243 million, respectively. The Loop signal upgrades are needed to run the new AC propulsion rail and replace a signal system that is more than 30 years old at a junction where the Brown, Orange, Purple, Pink and Green lines enter and exit the Loop.

Both projects will enable the CTA to modernize the overall signal system, increasing efficiency and service reliability. CTA also is working on a $7 million project to upgrade the signal system at Howard to modernize and increase reliability.

CTA continues work on the Red Line Cermak-Chinatown rehabilitation project, which calls for constructing a new secondary entrance at Archer Avenue and rebuilding the main station house to include an elevator, making the station accessible. CTA opened the Archer entrance in June and expects to reopen the main station house by 2010's end. The $12.5 million project began in 2009 and is expected to be complete later this year.

The Chicago Department of Transportation also is constructing a $38.3 million in-fill station at Morgan and Lake that will serve CTA's Green and Pink lines. The Morgan station is designed to provide access to the industrial and commercial districts in Chicago's West Loop area. Work began in summer and is expected to be completed in 2012.

CTA and the village of Skokie, Ill., are partnering to build an at-grade, accessible station in downtown Skokie at Oakton. The new station will be located adjacent to the Illinois Science and Technology Park. The facility will accommodate four-car trains. Work on the station began in summer 2010 and is scheduled to be completed in late 2011. The Oakton station will cost about $20 million to build, with the village of Skokie funding $6 million and an additional $14 million coming from Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality federal funds.

CTA received $241 million in stimulus funds, which were used for various projects, including the Dearborn Subway (Blue Line) track reconstruction, refurbishment of rail cars and buses, and renovation of the Cermak-Chinatown station.

Contact: Marina Popovic, vice president of purchasing; 312-681-2400; mpopovic@transitchicago.com

 

MINNESOTA

Metro Transit

Metro Transit operates transit service in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area, providing 100 percent of rail service and 90 percent of regular-route bus service in the Twin Cities. Light-rail service launched in 2004 and commuter-rail service launched in 2009.

Route miles: 12 light rail; 40 commuter rail

Rolling stock: Six locomotives, average age 1 year; 18 rail cars, average age 1 year; 27 light-rail trains with up to 3 cars per consist, average age 6 years

Annual ridership: 9.9 million light-rail; numbers unavailable for commuter rail (service opened in November 2009)

Annual operating cost: $25.7 million, light rail; 16.8 million, commuter rail

Annual capital cost: Not provided

Number of stations: 19 light rail; 6 commuter rail

In 2011, Metro Transit will begin building the Central Corridor light-rail line linking downtown St. Paul and downtown Minneapolis via the University of Minnesota campus. The $957 million project spans 11 miles with 23 stations, including five that will be shared with the existing Hiawatha light-rail line.

Contact: Bob Gibbons, director of customer services; 612-349-7509; robert.gibbons@metc.state.mn.us

 

MISSOURI

St. Louis Metro

St. Louis Metro provides light-rail and bus service in the St. Louis area. Light-rail service was launched in 1993.

Route miles: 46 light rail

Rolling stock: 87 light-rail trains with 2 cars per consist, average age 12 years

Annual ridership: 18 million

Annual operating cost: $36 million

Annual capital cost: $50 million in FTA funding; $42 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds

Number of stations: 37

2010 capital projects include:

  • $23 million to purchase and install an automatic fare collection system using smart card technology;
  • $7.3 million for the addition of a transit plaza and station improvements at the Grand MetroLink station;
  • $3.5 million to repair slopes along a section of MetroLink alignment in Illinois due to bank erosion;
  • $24 million for structural repairs and repainting the Eads Bridge;
  • $8.5 million to add interlocking and repair slopes at the University of Missouri-St. Louis MetroLink Station; and
  • $5.8 million to add a track crossover on the east end of the Eads Bridge.

Contact: Scott Grott, chief of MetroLink operations; 314-982-1464; sgrott@metrostlouis.org

 

NEW JERSEY

Port Authority Transit Corp. (PATCO)

PATCO operates a rapid transit line from Center City Philadelphia to Lindenwold in southern New Jersey. Service was launched in 1969.

Route miles: 14.5 heavy rail

Rolling stock: 121 rail cars, average age 37 years

Annual ridership: 10 million

Annual operating cost: $40 million

Annual capital cost: Capital costs are included in annual operating costs

Number of stations: 13

Capital improvement projects under way or scheduled to begin within the next year include:

  • Remanufacturing rail cars, which is expected to cost $220 million. The project is slated to begin in 2011 and be completed sometime in 2015.
  • Track and electrical system rehabilitation over the Ben Franklin Bridge. The project, estimated to cost $45 million, is expected to be completed in 2012.
  • Roadway overpass and underpass painting and structural repairs. Expected to cost $10 million, the project started this year and should be completed in 2011.

PATCO also plans to construct a $7.5 million shop annex that is expected to be completed in 2011. In addition, the agency plans to reopen the Franklin Square subway station in Philadelphia. Project design is under way. Cost and duration were being determined as of press time.

PATCO also received $10 million in stimulus funding to complete a pole-line replacement project.

 

NEW MEXICO

Rio Metro Regional Transit District (Rail Runner)

Rail Runner launched commuter-rail service in 2006.

Route miles: 100 commuter rail

Rolling stock: 9 locomotives; 22 rail cars, average age 3 years

Annual ridership: 1.2 million

Annual operating cost: $22 million

Annual capital cost: $3 million

Number of stations: 12

Rio Metro received $2.1 million in stimulus funds to renovate Kewa Station.

Contact: Chris Blewett, director; 505-724-3634; cblewett@mrcog-nm.gov

 

NEW YORK

MTA Long Island Rail Road (LIRR)

LIRR launched commuter-rail service in 1834.

Route miles: 701 commuter rail

Rolling stock: 45 locomotives, average age 11 years; 1,006 electric rail cars, average age 9 years; 134 diesel rail cars, average age 11 years

Annual ridership: 83 million

Annual operating cost: $1.7 billion

Annual capital cost: $136 million (2010)

Number of stations: 124

Capital improvements include:

  • Constructing the Babylon train wash facility ($25.5 million; began August 2009, completion April 2012)
  • Rehabilitating the Atlantic Avenue viaduct ($77.3 million; began August 2009, completion December 2010).
  • Replacing direct-fixation fastening system on the Amityville-Copiague-Lindenhurst line ($61.5 million; began January 2008, completion December 2010).
  • Rehabilitating the Queens Boulevard Bridge ($21 million; design and completion date to be determined).
  • Rehabilitating the Port Washington Branch retaining walls and bridge abutments ($19 million; began September 2009, completion May 2011).
  • Performing infrastructure improvements at Colonial Road in Great Neck ($3 million for design only; design completion July 2011).

In addition, LIRR is preparing for the 2010 State of Good Repair Track Program, estimated to cost $62.4 million. The majority of the work will be performed using in-house labor. Work includes wood tie and switch replacement, grade crossing rehabilitation, track surfacing, rail welding, and continuous welded rail renewal. The major contracts associated with this year's track program have been awarded to Loram Maintenance of Way Inc., which provides specialized track equipment. The project began in March and is expected to be completed in December.

MTA Metro-North Railroad

MTA Metro-North provides regional rail service to New York City's northern suburbs. The commuter-rail service was launched in 1983.

Route miles: 385 commuter rail

Rolling stock: 58 locomotives; 813 electric rail cars; 283 coaches. 380 cars are on order from Kawasaki. Delivery is expected to begin this year and be completed in 2012.

Annual ridership: 80 million

Annual operating cost: $1.3 billion

Annual capital cost: Not provided

Number of stations: 124

MTA Metro-North is in the midst of its 2010 cyclical track program that includes replacing wood ties and rail, along with cyclical surfacing on the Hudson, Harlem and New York portion of the New Haven lines. This year's program is expected to cost $26 million.

Other capital plans include:

  • $68 million for West of Hudson signal improvements.
  • $28 million for positive train control installation on all Metro-North East of Hudson main line tracks.
  • $26 million for mainline turnout replacement, including the installation of high-speed turnouts in some locations.
  • $10 million for Harlem River Lift Bridge Cable Replacement.
  • $6.5 million for viaduct repairs at two locations.

In addition, Metro-North is using federal stimulus money to fund a number of facility improvements:

  • $38.1 million to make improvements at Tarrytown Station;
  • $7.7 million to rehabilitate and upgrade 10 existing passenger elevators at Grand Central Terminal; and
  • $4.6 million to replace windows and doors at Poughkeepsie Station.

Metro-North also is making various renovations at Grand Central Terminal. The total budget is $23.5 million, of which $21.9 million in stimulus funding has been allocated and $1.6 million will come from the capital budget.

Contact: Anthony Bombace, director of procurement and material management; 212-340-3055; bombace@mnr.org

MTA New York City Transit (NYCT)

NYCT provides subway, bus and Access-A-Ride service in New York City and operates the Staten Island Railroad on Staten Island. Service was launched service in 1904.

Route miles: 232.5

Rolling stock: 72 locomotives, average age 31 years; 6,378 rail cars, average age 15.8 years; 28 locomotives on order from MotivePower Inc., to be delivered in December 2011; 23 rail cars on order from Kawasaki Rail Car Inc., to be delivered in October 2012.

Annual ridership: 1.58 billion

Annual operating cost: $2.53 billion

Annual capital cost: $2 billion

Number of stations: 468

NYCT is in the process of upgrading communication systems at 409 stations, as well as upgrading its VHF radio system — a project estimated to cost $774.4 million.

Other projects include:

  • Various station and structure rehabilitation projects ($1.34 billion).
  • Various signal upgrades ($1.3 billion).
  • Mainline track replacement ($239.5 million).
  • Power upgrades at four stations ($156.2 million).
  • Purchasing yard signals for the Corona-Flushing line ($102.1 million).
  • Two vent plants ($79.8 million).
  • Tunnel lighting replacement on two lines ($77.9 million).
  • Work on vent facilities at eight locations ($73.2 million).
  • 29 mainline switches ($54.8 million).

NYCT also contracted L.K. Comstock for a Church Avenue interlocking and automatic signal modernization. The total project budget is $210.7 million.

The agency received $475.1 million in federal stimulus funding.

Port Authority Trans Hudson (PATH)

A subsidiary of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ), PATH serves as a primary transit link between Manhattan and neighboring New Jersey communities. The rail line has been in operation since 1907. It became a PANYNJ subsidiary in 1962.

Route miles: 13.8 heavy rail

Rolling stock: 1 locomotive, 11 years old; 256 rail cars, average age 35 years; and an additional 150 rail cars with an average age of 1 year. Three hundred fifty rail cars on order with Kawasaki Rail Car Inc., with delivery in third-quarter 2011.

Annual ridership: 72.3 million

Annual operating cost: $291.8 million

Annual Capital Cost: $319.8 million

Number of stations: 13

The PANYNJ board authorized more than $340 million worth of contracts to help replace antiquated mechanical train controls with computerized signals. The overall signal project is expected to cost $580 million and is part of a PANYNJ multi-billion-dollar plan to modernize the entire PATH system — an initiative that also includes acquiring a new 350-car fleet. The entire fleet is expected to be replaced by the end of 2011.

Contact: Dennis Kopik, procurement contract manager; 212-435-3931; dkopik@panynj.gov

 

NORTH CAROLINA

Charlotte Area Transit System (CATS)

CATS is the transit department within the city of Charlotte. Light-rail service was launched in 2007.

Route miles: 10 light rail

Rolling stock: 20 light-rail trains with 2 cars per consist, average age 2.5 years

Annual ridership: 4.8 million

Annual operating cost: $10 million

Annual capital cost: $500,000

Number of stations: 15

CATS has no capital projects in progress at this time.

Contact: Tom Livingston, manager of procurement; 704-432-0491; tlivingston@charlottenc.gov

 

OHIO

Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority (GCRTA)

GCRTA provides rail, bus and paratransit services in Cuyahoga County. Light-rail service was launched in 1920; heavy-rail service in 1952.

Route miles: 26.2 light rail; 38.6 heavy rail

Rolling stock: 48 light-rail trains with 1 car per consist for daily service and 2 cars per consist for special events — average age 29 years. Rebuilding in process with 34 completed.

Annual ridership: 2.8 million light rail; 5.2 million heavy rail

Annual operating cost: $32.3 million

Annual capital cost: $12.6 million

Number of stations: 34 light-rail; 18 heavy rail

GCRTA is in the process of updating three stations: Puritas, East 55th and Woodhill.

Contact: Frank Polivka, procurement director; 216-771-4133; fpolivka@gcrta.org

 

OREGON

Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District of Oregon (TriMet)

TriMet provides public transportation service to the Portland metropolitan area, including MAX light-rail service (launched in 1986) and WES commuter-rail service (launched in 2009).

Route miles: 52 light rail; 14.7 commuter rail

Rolling stock: 127 light-rail trains with 2 cars per consist; average age 11.45 years

Annual ridership: 35.2 million, light rail; 124,940, commuter rail (FY2009)

Annual operating cost: $67.6 million, light rail; $3.1 million, commuter rail (FY2009)

Annual capital cost: $168.8 million, light rail; $25.6 million, commuter rail (FY2009)

Number of stations: 84 light rail; 5 commuter rail

TriMet is in the preliminary engineering phase for the Portland-to-Milwaukie light-rail line — the region's sixth MAX corridor. The project includes adding 10 MAX stations along a 7.3-mile alignment linking downtown Portland, Milwaukie and Oak Grove in North Clackamas County. The line will extend from the new Green Line at Portland State University to south Waterfront and into inner Southeast Portland, Milwaukie and Oak Grove. A major project feature is a multi-use transit bridge across the Willamette River that will carry MAX trains, buses, bicycles, pedestrians and a potential Portland Streetcar extension. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2011, with service expected to begin in 2015.

The agency also will make improvements to its eastside light-rail stations, including painting shelters and making pedestrian improvements such as adding new signage and crossing safety measures. One station is being renovated to include a fare zone with barrier railings to channel pedestrians and improve fare inspection and safety.

TriMet was awarded $53.3 million in federal stimulus funds to fix failing infrastructure, make the transit system more robust and create jobs.

 

PENNSYLVANIA

The Port Authority of Allegheny County

The Port Authority of Allegheny County provides light-rail, bus, incline and paratransit service for the greater Pittsburgh region. Light-rail service was launched in 1985.

Route miles: 15.5 light rail

Rolling stock: 83 light-rail trains with 1 to 2 cars per consist, average age 5 years

Annual ridership: 7.1 million (2009)

Annual operating cost: $43.2 million

Annual capital cost: $14.1 million

Number of stations: 25

The port authority has awarded contracts for the North Shore Connector project, which will extend light-rail service from downtown Pittsburgh under the Allegheny River to two new North Shore stations. The total project budget is $528 million — $62 million of which comes from federal stimulus funds.

TriGold, a joint venture of HDR, Jacobs Engineering and Kwame, has been contracted as program/construction manager. AECOM was awarded the design contract. North Shore Constructors, a joint venture of Trumbull and Obayashi, have been selected as the contractor for tunnel-boring work and the Gateway Station shell. Brayman Construction Corp. was selected as contractor for aerial structure work. Wellington Power Corp. has been awarded the systems contract for the North Shore Connector project, as well as a contract to perform station electrical work. Whiting-Turner Contracting Co. was tabbed for general station finishing work. McKamish has been contracted to perform HVAC and plumbing work at the stations. Schindler Elevator Corp. will perform elevator and escalator work in the stations. The new line is expected to enter service in early 2012.

Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA)

SEPTA operates light-, heavy- and commuter-rail service in the Philadelphia region. Light-rail service launched in 1893. Heavy-rail service launched in 1907. Commuter-rail service launched in 1832.

Route miles: 56.1 light rail; 24.1 heavy rail; 292 commuter rail

Rolling stock: 8 locomotives, average age 16 years; 352 rail cars, average age 33 years — plus 120 Silverliner V electric multiple units on order from Rotem (scheduled to be delivered in October 2011). SEPTA also operates light-rail trains with 1-2 cars per consist — average age 25 years (exact number of light-rail trains not provided)

Annual ridership: 29.4 million, light rail; 93.3 million, heavy rail; 35 million, commuter rail

Annual operating cost: $97.9 million, light rail; $202.8 million, heavy rail; $271.7 million, commuter rail

Annual capital cost: $21 million, light rail; $32 million, heavy rail; $90 million, commuter rail

Number of stations: 53 light rail; 74 heavy rail; 153 commuter rail

SEPTA will spend $322.9 million on improvements at 75 stations, including new signage at 24 stations; platform improvements at 24 stations; new buildings at seven stations; building rehabilitation at 10 stations; new lighting at eight stations and new roofs at six stations. The agency also will repaint several stations and repair a tunnel at the Curtis Park station.

SEPTA will receive $191 million in federal stimulus funds to complete 32 capital projects.

Contact: Gary P. Fairfax, press officer; 215-580-3782; gfairfax@septa.org

 

TEXAS

Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART)

DART provides light-rail, commuter rail (in cooperation with the Fort Worth Transportation Authority — see listing for Trinity Railway Express), bus, paratransit and high-occupancy vehicle services for 13 cities in north Texas. Light-rail service launched in 1996.

Route miles: 48 light rail

Rolling stock: 115 light-rail trains with up to 3 cars per consist — average age 8 years. 48 SLRV 3-car trains are on order from Kinkisharyo. Delivery began in April 2010 and is expected to be completed in May 2011.

Annual ridership: 19 million (2009)

Annual operating cost: $91.4 million (FY2010)

Annual capital cost: $867.9 million (FY2010)

Number of stations: 39 (as of September 2009)

DART plans to complete construction of the 28-mile, 20-station Green Line light rail in December. In addition, the agency will open an infill station on the Blue Line in the Lake Highlands area of northeast Dallas. Work also continues on the new Orange and Blue line extensions.

The agency has received $78.4 million in stimulus funds for the Green Line construction and $61.2 million for the Orange Line.

Trinity Railway Express (TRE)

TRE is a commuter-rail line connecting the downtowns of Dallas and Fort Worth, as well as DFW International Airport. The service, which launched in 1996, is operated by Dallas Area Rapid Transit and the Fort Worth Transportation Authority.

Route miles: 34 commuter rail

Rolling stock: 9 locomotives, average age 17 years; 17 rail cars, average age 17 years

Annual ridership: 2.8 million

Annual operating cost: $20 million

Annual capital cost: $5 million

Number of stations: 10

TRE will continue work on the Belt Line Grade Separation, a 2.2-mile double track project that began in August 2007. The $43 million project, which consists of an 8,230-foot-long double tracked bridge, eliminates three grade crossings. The grade separation is 95 percent completed.

Contact: Bill Farquhar, chief operating officer; 973-399-1948; bfarquhar@the-t.com

 

UTAH

Utah Transit Authority (UTA)

UTA provides TRAX light-rail, FrontRunner commuter-rail and bus service. Light-rail service was launched in 1999. Commuter-rail service was launched in 2008.

Route miles: 20 light rail; 45 commuter rail

Rolling stock: 20 locomotives, average age 1 year; 63 rail cars — 38 are 2 years old or less, 25 are 36 years old and have been overhauled; 15-20 light rail trains (69 vehicles total) with 2-4 cars per consist, average age 15 years; plus 77 S70 low-floor light-rail cars on order from Siemens. Delivery began in January 2010.

Annual ridership: 13.2 million, light rail; 1.3 million, commuter rail

Annual operating cost: $20 million, light rail; $14.7 million, commuter rail

Annual capital cost: $8 million combined for light- and commuter-rail capital projects

Number of stations: 28 light rail; 8 commuter rail

UTA is in the midst of its FrontLines 2015 program, which calls for building 70 miles of rail lines — four light rail and one commuter rail. The $2.5 billion program includes the Mid-Jordan line, a 10.5-mile corridor branching off from the existing Sandy/Salt Lake light-rail line at the 6400 South station, then running west and south to South Jordan; a 5.1-mile West Valley line between the 2100 South Central Pointe station and West Valley City; the six-mile Airport TRAX line between downtown Salt Lake City and Salt Lake City International Airport; the 3.5-mile Draper light-rail extension; and the 44-mile FrontRunner South commuter-rail line.

Contracts awarded to date include:

  • A Kiewit/Herzog/Parsons Joint Venture was awarded a $535 million contract for the Mid-Jordan light-rail line, which is scheduled to begin operations in 2011.
  • A Stacey-Witbeck/Kiewit Joint Venture was awarded a $370 million contract for the West Valley light-rail line, which is scheduled to begin operations in 2011.
  • A Stacey-Witbeck/Kiewit Joint Venture received a $350 million contract for the Airport light-rail line, which is scheduled to enter service in 2013.
  • A Kiewit/Herzog/Parsons Joint Venture was awarded a $212 million contract for the Draper light-rail extension, which is scheduled to begin operations in 2014.
  • A Stacey-Witbeck/Herzog Joint Venture received a $850 million contract for the FrontRunner South commuter-rail line, which is scheduled to enter service in 2013.
  • A Stacey-Witbeck/Herzog Joint Venture was awarded a $50 million contract for the Jordan River Service Center, which is expected to open in 2011. Ascent Construction received the contract for shop interior work.

Contact: Val Todd, 801-237-1925; Vtodd@rideuta.com, or Gregg Larson, 801-237-1924; Glarsen@rideuta.com

 

VIRGINIA

Virginia Railway Express (VRE)

VRE is a commuter-rail agency serving northern Virginia and Washington, D.C. VRE launched service in 1992

Route miles: 90 commuter rail

Rolling stock: 21 locomotives, average age 40 years; 101 rail cars, 71 of which are 3 years or younger; and 30 that are 40 years or older

Annual ridership: 3.85 million

Annual operating cost: $70 million

Annual capital cost: $20 million

Number of stations: 18

VRE is building an 11-mile stretch of track from Arkendale to Powell's Creek, Va. Construction on the $75 million project is expected to begin in first-quarter 2011 and be completed in 2013. The project was designated by the commonwealth and federal government as a priority in the development of high-speed rail.

In 2009, VRE received $9.9 million in stimulus funding to purchase new locomotives.

 

WASHINGTON

Sound Transit

Sound Transit plans, builds and operates regional transit systems and services to improve mobility for the Central Puget Sound region. Commuter-rail service was launched in 2000. Light-rail service was launched in 2009.

Route miles: 16 light rail; 74 commuter rail

Rolling stock: 11 locomotives, average age 9 years; 58 rail cars, average age 8 years; 35 light-rail trains with 2 cars per consist, average age 1.7 years. 27 LF70 cars on order from Kinkisharyo. Delivery is expected to begin in November and be completed by April 2011.

Annual ridership: 8.1 million, light rail; 2.7 million, commuter rail

Annual operating cost: $48 million, light rail; $36 million, commuter rail

Annual capital cost: $383 million, light rail; $125 million, commuter rail

Number of stations: 13 light rail; 10 commuter rail

Sound Transit projects include:

  • Sound Transit is in the midst of its University Link Extension — a $1.9 billion, 3.15-mile extension of the Central Link line that will be located entirely underground. Sound Transit has contracted Northlink Transit Partners for final design of civil engineering and architectural construction contracts; LTK Engineering Service, for final design of systems elements; PB Americas Inc., for providing design management resources; START (a joint venture of CH2M Hill and Jacobs Transportation), for construction management consulting for the project; Traylor-Frontier-Kemper, for boring the tunnel from the University of Washington station site to the Capitol Hill station site; and JCM U-Link Joint Venture (a joint venture of Jay Dee, Coluccio, Michels) for boring the tunnel from the Capitol Hill station to the Pine Street Stub Tunnel. Station construction and systems contracts have not yet been awarded. Construction on major projects connected with U-Link began in February 2010 and are expected to be completed by 2016.
  • M Street-to-Lakewood and D-to-M streets track and signal projects. For the $78.6 million dollar M Street-to-Lakewood project, BERGER/ABAM has been contracted to perform the environmental review; HDR Inc. for preliminary engineering and final design; AECOM for construction management; and RailWorks Track Systems for construction. Final design was completed in September 2008. Construction began in June 2009 and is expected to be completed by year's end.
  • For the $161.6 million D-to-M streets project, BERGER/ABAM and Herrera have been contracted to perform the environmental review; HDR Inc., for preliminary engineering and feasibility studies; Parsons Brinckerhoff, for enhanced preliminary engineering and final design; and MidMountain Inc., for construction. Project design was completed in December 2009. Construction is expected to begin in fall 2010 and be completed in summer 2012.
  • Sound Transit has received $23 million in Section 5307 Federal Transit Administration funds. The agency will use $4.6 million for each of the following projects: The Mountlake Terrace Freeway Station, Tukwila Station, M Street-to-Lakewood track and signal project, University Link project, and hybrid bus procurement.

Contact: Geoff Patrick; 206-398-5313; geoff.patrick@soundtransit.org

 

CANADA

Calgary Transit

Calgary Transit provides transit service in the city of Calgary. Light-rail service was launched in 1981.

Route miles: 29.25

Rolling stock: 153 light-rail trains with 3 cars per consist — average age 16.85 years. Thirty-eight SD-160 cars were ordered from Siemens Transportation Systems. Delivery was completed in June

Annual ridership: 77.4 million

Annual operating cost: Not provided

Annual capital cost: Not provided

Number of stations: 38

Earlier this year, Calgary Transit began construction on the five-mile, six-station West LRT line in southwest Calgary. The line is scheduled to open in late 2012.



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